Collaborative Cloud Strategies and Impacts #il2013 #internetlibrarian

Kenley Neufeld, library director, Santa Barbara City College

Small library, nobody responsible solely for tech.

Needed new system. Wanted to eliminate server and desktop maintenance.

Wanted to expand services, improve student experience and staff workflow.

Wanted to prepare for increased mobile use.

– Cloud-based backend
– Web-based frontend
– Cost savings from not maintaining a server

Went with OCLC Worldshare Management System

Change management:
– Do your homework
– Engage everyone
– Work with vendor on problems

For students:
– Easy account management without a separate authentication (could be a problem, since it requires sharing info with cloud vendor). However, the last piece of authentication data remains local. Works with Shibboleth.
– Notice and reminders via e-mail
– Platform agnostic
– Single search: ILS bundled with discovery service
– Faceted search
– Deeper exposure to resources
– Simple integration of ILL

For staff:
– No servers to maintain, no software to install
– Use Windows or Macs
– Simplified circulation
– Integrated ILL
– Integrated budget tracking
– Instruction: can teach discovery system or individual databases
– Work anywhere
– App development (Used to hand-copy fines from circ system to college system; was able to automate this.)

Would like to have a shelflist, but OCLC hasn’t built that yet. May be in the December update.

Performance is determined by Internet speed. If OCLC goes down, all 150 libraries using the system go down. In Internet access is lost, he has a backup solution.

Over a period of 3 years, they break even. And got the discovery layer that they couldn’t afford before.

Rob Ross, OCLC

Says users are satisfied. Catalogers and system administrators save a lot of time.

Staff working on an analytics model. More reports will be available.

Open platform: customers can build apps or see what others have done. OCLC builds the core functions, but open it up for others to add to.

Traditional deployed software:
– Core apps only
– Closed to community contributions

Cloud software:
– Core apps as scaffolding
– Community empowered to contribute
– Mix and match to heart’s content

Updates:
Traditional:
– Infrequent, anxiety-producing

Cloud:
– Smaller, frequent updates
– Everyone on the same version

Change:
Traditional:
– One person could read the manual and become the master

Cloud:
– Rewards continual learning
– Decentralized system allows mastery by module, distributed expertise
– Future state is — literally — what you make it.

Implications:
– Staff need to keep learning
– Management needs to reward adaptation over mastery
– Job roles may be redefined
– Working from anywhere is possible. Example: small academic library could bring books to a campus fair and can checkout using iPad or iPhone. Example 2: consortium can do cataloging for members. Example 3: Academic library with world-class Afghanistan collection. Now they can hire somebody and have them work in Afghanistan.

Gains include:
– Contemporary system for all materials formats
– No hardware to purchase or manage
– WorldCat as your catalog of record (can still have local notes), but you inherit all upgrades (such as if another library adds table of contents notes)

– Cost savings
– Time savings
– Patron satisfaction
– Staff satisfaction
– Increased usage of materials

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