Virtually Interacting with Books and Exhibits #internetlibrarian #IL2014

[Belated notes from a session at Internet Librarian.]

John Shoesmith, of the University of Toronto rare books library, talked about their efforts to put their exhibits online.  Physical exhibits only work for those who can get to the library while they are going on, but online exhibits can reach people far beyond the library and long after the exhibits are over.

Used:

  • Drupal: mirrored existing site (require hand-holding byt IT staff)
  • Omeka: open-source content-management system.  Used its exhibit builder plug-in for display.
  • Islandora: tools.
  • Fedora: repository.

For labor: museum studies students.

Juan Denzer, Binghamton University library

Their library director heard about how the National Library of China has a newspaper reader that works with gestures from the user.  They replicated the system to create 3-D models of rare books, allowing the user to view them without actually handling them.

Library Support for Digital Scholarship at Harvard Business School #internetlibrarian #IL2014

[Belated notes from a session at Internet Librarian.]

Michael J. Hemment of the Baker Library, Harvard Business School

The university is studying the faculty research cycle.  The law library is working on a digital archive on the history of the law school.  The university is thinking about students’ needs 20 years in the future.  Does the library help them get a job?

Question for a (any?) database project: try to get everything or concentrate on quality materials?

The library produces 118 information products: research guides, e-mail newsletters, etc.

Journalists write about Harvard research in a section of the web site called Working Knowledge.

Information management services: helps other university web sites improve their visibility with taxonomy, etc.

The library is trying to understand customers’ needs and work backwards from there.  “We librarians make assumptions about what our customers need and don’t talk to them on an ongoing basis.  Needs may change.”

Talking to users, observers.

Ongoing analysis on requests: matching them to existing resources.  If nothing exists, they identify a gap.

Web site on the research lifecycle: advice for each point.  Another one on the teaching lifecycle.

Surveys led to a redesign of case studies on their web site.  Also, use speaking with faculty and students, web analytics.

Leader 360: case studies on business leaders.

13 e-mail newsletters to MBA students on major industries.

Column on library special collections items in the Harvard Business Review (“Vision Statement”)

Helping faculty create e-books.

Updates on case studies (e.g., on Internet companies that may have changed considerably in the last few years).