Maximizing the Use of the Open Web, Gary Price #InternetLibrarian @InfoDocket

Gary Price

Slides at http://bit.ly/netlibrarianC

Open Web, for lack of a better term, is what you find on Google.

Interested in specialty resources, primary sources.  Example, recent report from International Red Cross had lots of great data on disasters.

How to get this info into traditional library resources?  People don’t know about this material.

People don’t know about putting phrases in quotation marks or using the site: operator.

How he searches for new resources on Google:

  1. Search by domain, such as site:senate.gov
  2. Use tools to limit within, say, past year
  3. Turn off relevance and sort by date
  4. Limit to filetype:pdf

Could send out by e-mail, blog, RSS feed.  You could use IFTTT to convert RSS to e-mail.

Zapier is similar to IFTTT.

Central repository for librarians to put their finds?

Could automatically update LibGuides or open textbooks.

Early attempts for librarians to curate the web: LII, IPL, BUBL.  People thought Google would solve all of these problems and we wouldn’t need curation.  Gary says curation is needed now more than ever, but we need to take it to the next level.

Somebody wants to know about mental health,  tell them about WHO’s MindBank — a curated database of international sources on mental health.  Don’t just tell them to go to the WHO site.

Used to be known as selective dissemination of information (SDI).

If you tell them about something when it’s new, you become known as the person who knows about new resources.  It may not always be useful to them, but it reminds them that you’re doing this.

If you tell people to go to your web site, they forget.  If you tweet something once, people may not see it hours or days later.

What if we take the trouble to add these reports to our collection and then the link goes dead?  Maybe we should be archiving them.  You can go to the Wayback Machine and use the “Save Page Now” option.

The UK government has an RSS feed of new government reports.

NY Academy of Medicine grey literature report.

California Research Bureau: “studies in the news” (California State Library)

[My own contribution to a specialty curated collection: http://tinyurl.com/waterdistrictclimate ]

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