Transforming Our View of Roles & Services, part 2 #InternetLibrarian @RebeccaJonesgal @desertlibrarian @stembrarian

Rebecca Jones, manager of branches for a large public library

Has worked in corporate libraries. Skills: project management, training (i.e., adult learning), knowledge management, I.T., consulting.

Important right now: project management, knowledge management, data management.

“Seize whatever you want to do.”

Ruth Kneale, system librarian at Daniel K. Inouye Solar Observatory

embedded, solo, runs all the databases, web sites, document manager, tech support.

Turned them on to things like Skype and Dropbox

Testing equipment at new observatory under construction.

Engineers still do “red lines” on paper drawings.  She takes pictures of them every three months to create as-built drawings.

Her job ends when construction is done in 3 1/2 years.

As the only librarian, she gets reference requests and does publication tracking (i.e., articles written based on work at the observatory).

Camille Mathieu, JPL

Six librarians, but also “knowledge managers” and “information managers” elsewhere and a large I.T. dept. that builds things in-house.

Does reference and publication tracking.

Shifting focus to internal information management.

Teresa Powell, Raytheon (previously Boeing and Rochester Electronics)

At Boeing, had to integrate collections and databases from companies that they acquired.  Eventually closed satellite libraries, centralized and digitized collections.

At Raytheon, again there are satellite libraries, which report to different manufacturing groups.  Have to justify space.  Wants to do something other than the traditional library.

Rebecca Jones:

Any organization has research and development.  Librarians could be part of that.

Librarians need to think more about ongoing operations and maintenance of service.

Librarians need to use our metadata skills to curate local data/documents.  What is happening with local newspaper, university publications, etc.?

Questioner:

Asking people, “What can we do for you?”

Or, “We can do X.”

Rebecca Jones:

Don’t do the first one.  Know what people’s needs and info seeking behaviors are and tell them how you can help.  Don’t ever ask people what they want.  They don’t have a clue.  Watch what people are doing, listen to what they say, do interviews, what are your biggest barriers, how can you expedite that?  Then figure out how you can help.

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