Let There Be Water: Israel’s Solution for a Water-Starved World by Seth M. Siegel: a review #water #Israel

Siegel outlines the many innovations Israel has made in the field of water and suggests that the rest of the world could benefit from its wisdom. Israel has exported its water know-how and technology to places like Africa, Iran (before the Islamic Revolution), and California.

Among Israel’s supply-side measures are:

  • Desalination of seawater
  • Desalination of brackish water in the desert
  • Intense use of wastewater (85% is reused)

Among demand-side measures:

  • Inculcation of a conservation ethos, extending even to schoolchildren and tourists
  • Drip irrigation (invented in Israel)
  • Full-cost pricing of water, even for agriculture

Siegel seems to have a bias toward free-market, capitalist solutions to water problems, but he admits that some of Israel’s innovations were developed by government programs (such as the National Water Carrier, the backbone of pipelines carrying water from north to south) and by kibbutzim, collective farms (such as Netafim, the drip irrigation pioneer).

He also admits that Israel came comparatively late to the idea of protecting its environmental water, but says that the development of the innovations listed above means that less water is taken from Lake Kinneret (the Sea of Galilee), the Jordan River, and smaller streams.

Siegel doesn’t have much to say about groundwater. He says that the brackish water extracted in the Arava desert is ancient water, which seems unsustainable in the long run. I think he also glosses over the disputes between Israelis and Palestinians over the West Bank aquifer.

However, he ends with a vision of Israelis, Palestinians, and Jordanians treating their lands as a common watershed with each providing what they can and all getting what they need. Even the Dead Sea could be saved from drying up. If all that happened, that surely would be a miracle.

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April 1st headlines in California #cawater #drought

Group A

Exotic animals deployed as Delta ‘weed whackers’
The Guaraní Aquifer’s Last GASP: Tex-Mex Consortium Corrals World’s Largest Liquid Freshwater Resource
Hose Across America

Group B

Sierra Snowpack is Virtually Gone; Water Content Now is Only 5 Percent

Governor Brown Directs First-Ever Statewide Mandatory Water Reductions

The headlines in one group are April Fool’s jokes.  The headlines in the other group are all-too-real.  The state Dept, of Water Resources recently put out a useful review: California’s Most Significant Droughts: Comparing Historical and Recent Conditions.

Speed blogging #cawater #climate_change

(TM David Zetland)

The late Pete Seeger sang about water, especially the Hudson River he fought for.

Have trouble understanding California’s water system? Even if you’ve lived in the state all your life? One of the foremost experts on the subject, Jay Lund, explains it all for you in one map.

All dry on the Western Front: Compare last year’s California snowpack with this year’s, in satellite images. Click on “View Image Comparison” to get a side-by-side view with a sliding divider.

Whether or not this is evidence of climate change, the long-term warming trend was sustained in 2013. Read more in NCDC’s Global Climate Report.

Climate scientists are 95 percent certain global warming is happening and human actions are largely the cause. AP science writer Seth Borenstein explains what 95% certainty of warming means to scientists.

President Obama said it Tuesday night:

But the debate is settled. Climate change is a fact. And when our children’s children look us in the eye and ask if we did all we could to leave them a safer, more stable world, with new sources of energy, I want us to be able to say yes, we did.

You might be inclined to argue, but these three arguments have been discredited:

“The warming is just part of a natural cycle.”

“We’ve been warming up since the last ice age.”

“To think humanity can influence the climate is pure arrogance.”

The Los Angeles Times’ letters page editor has no time for climate change denial:

Saying “there’s no sign humans have caused climate change” is not stating an opinion, it’s asserting a factual inaccuracy.

Such errors of fact won’t make it on the LAT’s letters page.

Lest you think that global warming was happening, but has leveled off since 1998: no, it hasn’t and here’s why.

One group that has a monetary stake in the matter is the reinsurance industry. If they bet that the climate will go on as usual and that there will be no more than the usual number of extreme events — and that turns out to be wrong — it could cost them tens of billions of dollars per year. There are no climate change deniers to be found in the reinsurance business.

Finally, if the West Virginia chemical spill were terrorism

New U.S. Water Quality Portal #waterquality

A new Water Quality Portal [waterqualitydata.us] was released by agencies of the U.S. federal government on May 1.

What is the WQP:

The Water Quality Portal (WQP) is a cooperative service sponsored by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Water Quality Monitoring Council (NWQMC) that integrates publicly available water quality data from the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) and the EPA STOrage and RETrieval (STORET) Data Warehouse.

The EPA water quality data originate from the STORET Data Warehouse, which is the EPA’s repository of water quality monitoring data collected by water resource management groups across the country. Organizations, including states, tribes, watershed groups, other federal agencies, volunteer groups and universities, submit data to the STORET Warehouse in order to make their data publicly accessible. For more information about STORET, see the STORET Home Page.

The USGS water quality data originate from the NWISWeb Database. The database contains current and historical water data from more than 1.5 million sites across the nation and is used by state and local governments, public and private utilities, private citizens, and other federal agencies involved with managing our water resources. For more information on what data are available and how NWIS data are mapped to the Water Quality Exchange (WQX) format, visit NWIS Water Quality Web Services.

More from the USGS:

The Portal provides a single, user-friendly web interface showing where water quality information is available from federal, state, tribal and other water partners. It reduces the burden to data users searching, compiling, and formatting water monitoring data for analysis, and provides scientists, policy-makers, and the public with a single web interface to query data stored in STORET and NWIS.

Data users can choose from a variety of filters including geographic and sample parameters, to narrow down the dataset by state, county, organization, watershed, and sites of interest. Downloaded data can be served out in comma-separated, tab-separated, MS Excel, Keyhole Markup Language (KML) and Extensible Markup Language (XML) file formats.

The Portal utilizes the common nomenclature known as the Water Quality Exchange (WQX) to retrieve data from NWIS and STORET and publish it in a consistent format. The Portal is designed to support additional data sources that are integrated with the WQX template. EPA offers a web-based data entry tool called WQX-Web that enables data owners to upload their data for use by the Portal.

Future enhancements to the portal include the development of the Portal’s interface, web services, and compatibility with popular mapping tools.

A trove of articles about California from the journal Climatic Change: Get ’em while they’re hot

The journal Climatic Change has recently published a series of valuable articles about the effects of climate change on California.

Introduction:

Second California Assessment: integrated climate change impacts assessment of natural and managed systems. Guest editorial

Water, Flooding, etc.:

Adapting California’s water system to warm vs. dry climates

Current and future impacts of extreme events in California

Potential impacts of increased coastal flooding in California due to sea-level rise

Potential increase in floods in California’s Sierra Nevada under future climate projections

Estimating the potential economic impacts of climate change on Southern California beaches

Effects of climate change and wave direction on longshore sediment transport patterns in Southern California

A methodology for predicting future coastal hazards due to sea-level rise on the California Coast

Social Issues:

Projecting long-run socioeconomic and demographic trends in California under the SRES A2 and B1 scenarios

Climate change-related impacts in the San Diego region by 2050

The climate gap: environmental health and equity implications of climate change and mitigation policies in California — a review of the literature

Agriculture:

Modifying agricultural water management to adapt to climate change in California’s central valley

Economic impacts of climate change on California agriculture

California perennial crops in a changing climate

Climate extremes in California agriculture

Effect of climate change on field crop production in California’s Central Valley

Economic impacts of climate-related changes to California agriculture

Case study on potential agricultural responses to climate change in a California landscape

Ecosystems:

The impact of climate change on California timberlands

The impact of climate change on California’s ecosystem services

Climate change and growth scenarios for California wildfire

Electric Power:

Simulating the impacts of climate change, prices and population on California’s residential electricity consumption

Climate change impacts on two high-elevation hydropower systems in California

Not specifically about California, but interesting:

A simple technique for estimating an allowance for uncertain sea-level rise

Note: Some of these articles are labeled “Open access,” which means the full text will be free indefinitely. Other articles may be free only until Dec. 31.

Whiskey, water, and Mark Twain

If you follow water issues long enough, especially in the West, you’ll hear or read: “Mark Twain said, ‘Whiskey is for drinking; water is for fighting over’.” And almost as often, someone else will say that Mark Twain probably didn’t say it, because no one has found it in his writings.

Finally, there’s a bit of new information on this topic. The publisher of Twainquotes.com, using Google Books, seems to have tracked it down to the 1960s. (Twain, of course, died in 1910.)

More from Alex Breitler

Via JFleck

More water literature

California water resources and Internet Archive

I have a lot of bulletins from the California Dept. of Water Resources (DWR) in my library. And like any forward thinking librarian, I want to provide my users with links in the catalog to electronic versions of the reports whenever possible. But why scan something when somebody else has done it first?

I knew that UC Davis’ library was adding e-copies of DWR reports to the Internet Archive, so I checked to see if they had done the ones I had. When I got to the California Water Resources collection there, I discovered a nice surprise: they have an RSS feed. So now I don’t have to keep checking back all the time; I can just follow the RSS feed. (It looks as if they do more scanning in the summer, naturally.)

OK, you’re thinking, that’s great if I’m interested in California water. Get this: the Internet Archive has almost three million texts. There’s a good chance there’s a collection that will interest you and that you’ll want to follow what they post.

Southern Africa

The British Geological Survey has posted an archive of grey literature on Southern African groundwater. Grey literature (or gray literature) is documents other than books or journal articles. It includes conference papers, pamphlets, unpublished reports, theses and dissertations, etc. It doesn’t always end up in libraries (or on the Internet), and even if it does, it doesn’t always get cataloged properly. In other words, it’s lost for all intents and purposes. I think this archive will be a real service to the people and nations of Southern Africa, who might not otherwise find this information about their own region.

(H/T Aquadoc at WaterWired)