Market Impact: Creating Positive Outcomes & Actions #InternetLibrarian @SusanSchramm

Susan Schramm

Slides at http://conferences.infotoday.com/documents/319/0845_Schramm.pptx

Libraries are catalysts for smart communities.

Smart communities: IoT, safe, comfortable

Vision:

Streets make changes based on traffic, parking adjusted.

Firefighter knows where the people are. AR with building plans. Doctor could advise EMTs on the way to the hospital.

Open data to solve social problems

Smart parks adjust lighting

Smart airports advise you about things to do.

We used to talk about if, now we talk about how and when.

Thinking about human effects. What about people replaced by robots? What about skills we may not have enough of? What about ethics, such as algorithms that discriminate? How do we make it of, by, and for all?

Libraries can help with this.

Libraries are doing in training in skills: Maker spaces, IoT, etc. Connecting with economic development folks to reach people who want to start new businesses.

Challenges: promotion, staffing, funding. (Same for everyone)

Lesson 1: Clarify our value proposition. What problems can we focus on solving? What do we contribute? What is the call to action for our community?

Keep asking, “So what?”

Why you? Why would I get that from the library?

Sometimes it’s the how that makes you different. Libraries are safe, neutral, local.

Why now? People say, “That’s nice, I’ll have to remember that.” What’s their call to action? How can you get them to do something now?

Lesson 2: Target our audiences. Who really wants to solve this problem? (Stakeholders, not just the people for whom you are solving the problem.). What positive outcomes can be created? What communities can we partner with? Who are the influencers and early investors?

You leverage by getting your message to other groups’ members (newsletters, advertising, etc.).

Lesson 3: Help our customers buy

Lesson 4: Ask the hard questions

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Digital archive from scratch, Solomon Blaylock #InternetArchive @SolomonBlaylock

Presentation at http://conferences.infotoday.com/documents/319/A205_Blaylock.pptx

Until recently at Middlebury Institute of International Studies, Monterey

When we started at the school, made a point of asking people, “What are you working on?”

Retired special ops/student is working on a special operations research database going back to World War II.

File types: videos, PDFs, Word docs, images, streaming links. Proof-of-concept site on WordPress.

Challenges:
* Standardization, naming conventions
* Site organization
* Improved searchability
* Scalability

* WordPress update
* Project plan: interviews, task list
* Resources: no time from I.T. Staff, had to do most of it himself and use network of contacts. UCLA intro to digital humanities; The Getty’s intro to metadata; Dublin Core guides.
* Workflow
* Guide, so he could hand it off to the project team. Data input standards. How to upload to Omeka. How to upload videos to YouTube and have it to do auto-transcriptions.

Installed Omeka on a server. I.T. Wanted to vet any plug-ins they wanted to use.

Documentation at: https://library.woodbury.edu/c.php?g=878987

Learning from customers/ patrons/ users/ clients #InternetLibrarian

Jeromy Wilson, Niche Academy

Presentation: http://conferences.infotoday.com/documents/319/D204_Wilson.pptx

* Get new people in the library
* Get people back to the library
* Enhance everyone’s experience
* Find unmet needs

How do we find out about patrons’ needs:

* One-on-one
* Observation
* Surveys
* Focus groups

Listen, seek to understand, repeat it back

Niche Academy provides tutorials on common library subscription databases. They collect data from hundreds of library systems (anonymized).

Consumer Reports gets a big spike in Nov.-Dec. Maybe you could promote it other times.

Libraries see a jump after marketing efforts.

Other sources of data:
* Circ data: not just numbers, but also types of interest
* E-resources: stats
* Video cameras to do people watching. (Hmm, this seems a little creepy.)

Crawled & Collected, now what? Access & discovery in web archives #InternetLibrarian @IndustryDocs @StanfordLibs @UCDavisLibrary @archiveitorg

Slides at http://conferences.infotoday.com/documents/319/A203_Lohndorf.pdf

Jillian Lohndorf, Internet Archive

Largest web archive in existence. Web archives aim to collect as much of the content/code as possible so it looks as close as possible to the original experience.

Topical collections.

Web history for a specific institution: records retention, FOIA laws, historical record. (Also national libraries collecting web sites from their countries.)

* Capture: Heritrix
* Storage: WARC is industry standard, redundant storage
* Access: Playback mechanism is necessary. Wayback has its own.

Additional consideration:
* Search (Archive-It)
* Metadata

Integrations:
* Catalog
* Web site
* WorldCat

Can create derivative files: metadata, visualization

Kris Kasianovitz, Stanford

Archives state and local government web sites. *ca.gov web space. California Digital Library, State Library, State Archives, U. Of California, Stanford.

Using Archive-It.

700+ seed URLs.

Realized they were missing metadata. Collection-level records on WorldCat. Did a “metadata sprint,” call for volunteers. Used Dublin Core fields: coverage, subject, languages, etc.

Agencies go away. Take info from “About” page.

Public libraries could call for suggestions for “seed” pages in their communities.

Kevin Miller, UC Davis

Using Archive-It.

Archives sites related to the campus and Davis community. Including UC Davis individuals, such as prominent faculty. A way to capture their work (such as on blogs) before they retire. Using ORCiD to find UC Davis faculty and their publications.

Automated taxonomy pilot for Archive-It. Script determines the “aboutness” of a website.

Integration with:
* Library catalog
* Finding aids

Rachel Taketa, UCSF

Industry documents from companies “that negatively impact public health.” Where they have strategies to mislead the public. For example, tobacco, chemicals (e.g., Monsanto), pharmaceuticals.

Collect documents that are produced during lawsuits, documents from whistleblowers.

Tobacco industry site has about about 15 million documents.

Coming soon: sugar industry.

https://idl.ucsf.edu

E-cigaratte advertising. Campaigns against cigarette taxes. (Campaign web site go down the day after the election.)

Access through Archive-It and on their site.

Using spreadsheet to cross load metadata from Archive-It to IDL.

Question re. Copyright: Internet Archive leaves it up to their partners. UCSF doesn’t worry about it: commercial and electoral materials. Stanford: state and local government sites can be copyrighted. Depend on robots.txt files to alert them. If they run into that, contact the agency. UC Davis: alert faculty and let them opt-out (in itself an opportunity for outreach as well).

Digitizing and Archiving, Susie Kopecky #InternetLibrarian

Allan Hancock College, Santa Maria

Have an archive from the Hancock family, whose estate is the site of the college. Also have an archive devoted to the history of the college.

Hancock was a wealthy oilman in Southern California in the early 20th century.

They have approximately 60 large, flat archival boxes, 28 wider boxes, photo boxes, newspaper clippings, correspondence, etc. Previous librarians cleaned the items and moved them to acid-free containers. None trained as archivists.

Sorted:
1. Cleaned and entered into an Aceess database.
2. Cleaned but not entered into the dB.
3. Neither cleaned nor entered into the dB.

A storage container suffered water damage.

Metadata: decide what info to enter and how to label items with unique identifiers. Former librarians volunteered.

* Year object created
* Accession no.
* Title
* Author
* Brief description
* Part of another collection?
* Subject
* Cross-listed events and individuals

Got a scanner.

Some of the first scans: telegrams and evidence of Captain Hancock’s pursuits.

Challenges:

* Scanner went missing
* Having limited time
* Not currently having volunteers
* MS Access is kind of clunky
* Scanning large amounts of info in a timely fashion. (Want to have something ready for 100th anniversary of college in 2020.)
* Want a cloud-based system to share collection

Hosting possibility: Airtable. Currently being used by a performing arts archive.

Software possibility: ArchivesSpace (formerly Archivist’s Toolkit)

Crowdsourcing ideas for the above. (History students as interns, California Digital Library)

Another problem: nitrate films are flammable. May not be able to keep them.

Suggestion: LC site on personal archiving. (Possibly
http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/personalarchiving/

Suggestion: Anything you do yourself takes lots of babying. ContentDM is expensive, but very nice.

Open source: Omeka S, Islandora

Brainstorming a content management program, Jaye Lapachet @JayeLapachet #InternetLibrarian

Jaye Lapachet, J8 Consulting

Slides here: http://www.jayelapachet.com/2018/10/17/internet-librarian-2018/

San Bruno fire, PG&E gas line blew up. PG&E had to go through pallets of documents. (SF Chronicle 3/5/2011)

Companies come to her when they are about to do an IPO and need to find documents for the SEC.

Start somewhere: it can be paper or digital.

* Culture
* People
* Process
* Systems
* Audit & control

Vague, but you can make them work for your organization. It has to work for your organization.

Culture: Try to disrupt ongoing business as little as possible.

People: Listen to ideas. Try to do things upfront that are quick wins. Findability can be one. People need to know that the way they do their work and find their information are being considered. They have to know that they’re being heard.

Process: Identifying silos. Don’t segregate by format. When someone goes to look for information, it’s all in there. Where content is needed. Information governance. Review taxonomies, but allow personal terms that may only show up for an individual user. Taxonomies need “care and feeding” (updating, etc.).

Systems: Not just buying tools. Inventory systems, which could be tools or software, but could be processes. What you have and how it’s being used. Expand those, merge them when possible.

Audit & control: regulations, etc.

Get a champion. Have succession planning in place (for yourself as the content manager).

Team collaboration spaces (e.g., Microsoft Teams, Google documents).

Find people’s hidden talents. You can make a database from that.

Think outside the box. Can blockchain help with content management? It’s good with people who don’t trust each other. Walmart is testing it with food products. Maybe a QR code could keep track of who opened a document and changed it.

Question about products to share documents with specific people: Lucidea has a project called Presto.

Question about Google Drive and privacy: Google is going to know what you put up there. Make sure you use their business products. I don’t think you have any privacy with Google, but read your contract. Dropbox and Box might be better, since they are meant for business.

When you work for a company, any work you do if for the company. But if people are concerned about privacy, you can anonymize things.

You can read the contract. You can ask for changes.

Her web site is: http://www.jayelapachet.com.

Tomorrow’s architects, Peter Morville @morville #InternetLibrarian

Told story of John Brown, the abolitionist.

Developed the idea of information architecture.

Went to work for Library of Congress in 2009. There were 100 separate sites, which he compared to the Winchester Mystery House. He wrote a report, which offended people. Eventually they came around. He worked on loc.gov, congres.gov, and copyright.gov

The job of the information architect is to create “environments for understanding.” German word “merkwelt,” unique ways of viewing the world.

2016 made him realize how people have lost track of the truth. Working with a Fortune 500 company that didn’t seem to care about their users or the truth. Started walking dogs, because he needed to do something that had nothing to do with the internet.

Wrote a book called “Planning for Everything.” “Ant and the Grasshopper.” People who act and plan concurrently succeed.

Perception and emotion may not be so much about the present moment, but guidance for the future.

“Getting Things Done” is a great book, but it focuses on productivity and it argues that there’s only one way to plan. Doesn’t consider meaning.

Borges. “Garden of Forking Paths.”

Many ways to plan.

Four principles: make planning more social, tangible, agile, and reflective. (Mnemonic: STAR)

Six practices: framing, imagining, narrowing, deciding, executing, reflecting. (Mnemonic: FINDER)

“It’s not fear that stops you; it’s your unwillingness to feel fear.” Life’s too short to play it safe, and repression doesn’t work.

Hope = willpower + waypower (Charles Snyder)

Narrowing paths: evaluation and filtering. Drivers and levers.

Searching often works better with breadth first, then depth.

Explaining things backwards can be a good technique. Writing the instructions for something can help you make a decision.

Pivot or persevere?

Involving different people can find different ways around obstacles. Diversity is a cure for unpredictable adversity.

Gary Kasparov: When was the last time you made a bad decision? Reflection. Nobody wants to relive bad experiences. Repression doesn’t work. Recovery requires telling the truth.

Elephants are matriarchal. The oldest female knows the way to food and water. But some of the old ways are closed off, perverse incentives.

John Brown believed the ends justified the means. He started a war to end slavery, which may not be over. Gandhi believed that in the means is the seeds of the ends.

The library is an act of “inspiration architecture.” We’ve never needed libraries more than we do right now. Let’s go toward the fear and create a better future.